When ‘happy’ homes can actually be dangerous – The Guardian

The UK’s latest house construction boom has sparked concerns over the dangers of “happy” homes, as the National Housing Federation (NHF) says they pose a threat to public safety.

The NHF says it is alarmed by the number of new houses that are being constructed in the UK each year and warns that they are being built in places where residents are at risk.

It has also raised concerns about the conditions in which they are constructed.

“The majority of new homes are being erected in areas where there is a high risk of house fires, which is a risk that we are currently seeing in the build-up to Christmas,” said NHF director of policy and communications, Simon Walker.

“These are not just new houses, they are places where people are at greater risk of fire and are at a greater risk in the event of a fire. “

“The NHF would urge the government to act quickly to remove any potential barriers to the safe building of homes in the future.” “

House builders are not the only ones raising concerns about their use of asbestos in their construction materials. “

The NHF would urge the government to act quickly to remove any potential barriers to the safe building of homes in the future.”

House builders are not the only ones raising concerns about their use of asbestos in their construction materials.

In April the NHF published a report saying that the use of a “non-standard” type of asbestos fibre could be causing health problems.

The NHf says the fibre has been used in some of the latest house projects, but it says it does not think that the fibre is being used correctly.

“In some cases, builders have been able to produce a product with a high fibre content and that has been known to cause health issues in people who are sensitive to the fibres,” Walker said.

HSBC warns of new asbestos hazards The HSBC Group has warned of a rise in new asbestos-related problems and the need to limit the use and use of the fibre in the building of new buildings.

HSB’s chief executive, John Riddell, told the BBC that while there were concerns that the new fibres used in the construction of new developments were not meeting the health, environmental and social guidelines, it was also important to note that “there is no evidence that they pose an immediate risk to the public”. “

[HSBC] is working closely with the UK’s Department for Communities and Local Government to establish the scope and scope of the health and environmental risk assessment in relation to asbestos fibre used in new and refurbished homes.”

HSB’s chief executive, John Riddell, told the BBC that while there were concerns that the new fibres used in the construction of new developments were not meeting the health, environmental and social guidelines, it was also important to note that “there is no evidence that they pose an immediate risk to the public”.

“HSBC believes that the fibreglass used in building new homes should be certified as non-hazardous and meets a number of quality standards that the regulator has in place for new construction,” Riddill said.